Awareness of cardiac arrest and CPR training rates in Australia

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Introduction

There is mounting evidence that CPR training and bystander CPR rates are related. Communities with higher bystander CPR rates also have higher resident CPR training rates, according to three studies to far. This is most likely the case because receiving CPR training is strongly linked to boosted self-assurance and readiness to perform CPR. Existing research also suggests that certain variables, such as age, education, nationality, and occupation, are related to CPR training. Additionally, socio economic issues must be looked at in light of the fact that regions with lower bystander CPR rates also have lower CPR training rates. Understanding the community’s existing CPR training rates is crucial since it could influence local activities.

Less than 60% of Australian adults, according to state-based polls, have at least once taken CPR training in Australia, where it is not now required. These surveys were, however, only done in a few places and most of them were done over ten years ago. This study aims to present the first estimates of CPR training and desire to learn CPR throughout all of Australia. To learn more, reach out cpr course

Methods

Data from the Heart Foundation of Australia’s “HeartWatch” Survey were used in this cross-sectional study. To reflect the characteristics of the larger Australian community, this quarterly survey is carried out using a purposeful, non-probability sampling method with quotas for age, gender, and area of residence. The study’s respondents are a part of an online survey panel. The survey now includes 21 CPR-related items that were added in July 2017 and were derived from earlier Australian surveys. Three categories made up the CPR test: defibrillator knowledge, understanding of cardiac arrest, and knowledge of CPR and experience.

Objective

Our goal was to present the first CPR training and cardiac arrest awareness statistics at the national level.

Participants

In order to represent the larger Australian population, a national cohort was recruited to participate in the survey using purposeful, non-probability sampling techniques with quotas for age, gender, and area of residence. Ten76 people participated in the final sample.

Principal outcome metric

To estimate the countrywide prevalence of CPR training and awareness, as well as the link between training and demographic parameters.

Results

Most respondents (76%) were Australian natives, with 51% being female and 66% being in the 35–64 age range. Only 16% of respondents were able to distinguish between a heart attack and a cardiac arrest. Only 22% were currently trained (within a year), despite 56% reporting having received CPR training in the past. Younger age (35 to 54 years) (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.0), being an Australian native (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.17) and greater levels of education (university, OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.57) were all related with CPR training. Respondents’ trust in their abilities to use a defibrillator and perform quality CPR increased after receiving CPR instruction. The most frequent justification given by respondents for not doing CPR on a person was a lack of training.

Strengths and weaknesses of this research

  • This is the first time a national study has been conducted in Australia regarding training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and knowledge of cardiac arrest.
  • Using probability sampling techniques that incorporated quotas for age, gender, and area of residence, a representative sample of Australians was polled.
  • Even though recall bias is one of the drawbacks of cross-sectional survey methodologies, our findings are in line with earlier Australian research.
  • Future polls of this kind will need to validate their survey questions, and they may use a combination of online and phone surveys to address the problem of respondents finding survey answers through web searches.

Patient and public participation

The general public was not consulted in the development of the study’s design or in the interpretation of the findings. However, the steering committee of the research group (Australian and New Zealand Prehospital Emergency Care Center of Research Excellence) includes members from the general public who will be consulted regarding the findings and strategies for disseminating this research at regularly scheduled meetings. Along with the study team, the Heart Foundation of Australia outlets will also be used to distribute the results. For supplementary information occupational health and safety training

Data analysis

Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics with proportions expressed as percentages and tests of association using X2 statistic between respondent characteristics and CPR training status. The characteristics of respondents that were independently related with CPR training were discovered using logistic regression. Characteristics with p values <0.2 at the univariate level were included in the model. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis in a subsample of respondents excluding those who reported they had previously performed CPR. Free text responses were categorically coded by two healthcare professionals (Registered Nurse (SC) and Paramedic (DS)) in parallel, both of whom are experienced community first aid trainers. These authors met several times to compare and discuss coding frameworks with outstanding disagreements referred to a third author (JB). Statistical significance for quantitative analysis was set at p <0.05 and analysis was conducted with Stata V.15.1.

Patient and public participation

The general public was not consulted in the development of the study’s design or in the interpretation of the findings. However, the steering committee of the research group (Australian and New Zealand Prehospital Emergency Care Center of Research Excellence) includes members from the general public who will be consulted regarding the findings and strategies for disseminating this research at regularly scheduled meetings. Along with the study team, the Heart Foundation of Australia outlets will also be used to distribute the results.

This Australian study’s (56%) prevalence of CPR training is comparable to other recent international surveys carried out in the UK (57%) and the USA (65%). But unlike these nations, Australia has no state- or national-level required training programme, and there have been little attempts to raise public awareness of cardiac arrest and CPR through the media (such as Shock Verdict). These tactics should be taken into consideration as they are crucial for raising awareness and information about cardiac arrest and CPR training.

Only a few professions in Australia require CPR training (ie, healthcare professionals, teachers, childcare workers and fitness instructors). The fact that younger working ages (35 to 54 years, OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.00) and those who attended both vocational college (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.64 to 3.30) and university (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.57) were independently associated with CPR training suggests that workplace training had an impact on our findings. Recent research from the USA shows that requiring CPR instruction in schools is linked to greater percentages of people who have received CPR training. mandatory on a local levelThe participation of numerous stakeholders, including the federal, state, and resuscitation councils, is necessary for training strategies. However, similar tactics have been used effectively in other places and shouldn’t be disregarded because they might guarantee that a significant section of the community receives CPR instruction, at least once in their lives.

Our findings support previous findings that those who have received CPR training had better levels of self-reported confidence in their ability to conduct CPR and utilize a defibrillator. In addition, lack of training emerged as the most frequent reason for not doing CPR in this study. Given the strong correlation between CPR training levels and bystander CPR rates, this emphasizes the significance of CPR instruction. Both in Australia and worldwide, CPR training is consistently linked to younger ages and better levels of education. Future training initiatives should think about focusing on populations that are less likely to obtain training, especially elderly people who are more likely to experience future cardiac episodes. In addition to the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, we emphasize educating high-risk groups like

Conclusion

Although the majority of untrained respondents were willing to learn, our statistics indicate that Australia’s CPR training rates have remained stable throughout the years. To raise knowledge of cardiac arrest and CPR, national training and awareness initiatives should take use of this desire. Such plans should take into account providing training to men, people with less education, and people who were born abroad.

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